Skip navigation
Menu Icon Menu Icon Menu Icon Menu Icon

Dominic Winter Auctioneers

Printed Books, Maps & Documents

A selection of lots being sold 

13 December 2017

Decorative Binding. L' Office de la Semaine-Sainte, à l'usage de Rome et de Paris. En Latin & en François. Avec l'explication des Cérémonies de l'Eglise..., Paris: Jacques Collombat, 1732, contemporary full red morocco (in the manner of Antoine Michel Padeloup le Jeune, fl. 1712-1758), decorated with gilt pointille, floral & foliage decoration, within interlaced fanfare ribbon strapwork design, bearing the gilt armorial of Louis XIV

Estimate: £300-500

Maximus (of Tyre). Philosophi Platonici Sermones e Graeca in Latinam linguam versi. Cosmo Paccio interprete, [Rome: Jacobum Mazochium, 1517], decorative border to title incorporating a hunting scene, bound in modern mottled calf, red morocco title and blind decoration to spine

Estimate: £500-800

G. Braun & F. Hogenberg. Londinium Feracissimi Angliae Regni Metropolis, published Cologne 1572 - 1574   Estimate £2000-3000

For further information please contact Nathan Winter or Chris Albury

nathan@dominicwinter.co.uk or henry@dominicwinter.co.uk

01285 860 006


The Library of Richard Adams

author of Watership Down

A selection of lots being sold

14 December 2017

Watch Nathan Winter and Susanna Winters introduce this exciting sale :

William Shakespeare. Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies, 1632.

The Second Folio Edition of the most important work in English Literature.

Estimate £40,000-60,000

Jane Austen. A complete set of first editions by Jane Austen uniformly bound by Riviere & Son, 1811-1818.

Estimate £50,000 - 80,000

William Golding. Lord of the Flies, 1st edition, 1954, authorial ink inscription to Richard Adams original red cloth in dustjacket, 8vo

A wonderful association copy inscribed by the author: 'For Richard Adams from William Golding'. Like Richard Adams, William Golding is chiefly known for his first novel, despite his subsequent literary output. Also like Adams, Golding's masterpiece was at first rejected multiple times by publishers. In addition, both authors were avid and expert chess players. They played correspondence chess together, and both belonged to a wider literary chess circle which included the poet and Oxford academic John Fuller, and journalist and critic Anthony Curtis. In his autobiography Richard Adams draws a parallel between an event in Golding's work and his own over-sensitive response to Schubert's 'Unfinished Symphony': "The pizzicato opening seemed grim and dire. I felt (although, of course, it hadn't yet been written) like Simon, in William Golding's 'Lord of the Flies', confronted by the pig's head on a stick. It assured him that life was a bad business.' (Richard Adams, The Day Gone By, 1990)

Estimate £1500-2000

Kenneth Grahame. The Wind in the Willows, 1st edition, Methuen, 1908, original gilt decorated blue-green cloth, 8vo

Richard Adams's own landmark work 'Watership Down' has been called the best story about wild animals since 'The Wind in the Willows', and although very different, both masterpieces take their place as classics of anthropomorphic writing. Richard Adams used a quotation from 'The Wind in the Willows' at the beginning of Chapter 33 in 'Watership Down', entitled 'The Great River': "Never in his life had he seen a river before - this sleek, sinuous, full-bodied animal... All was a-shake and a-shiver - glints and gleams and sparkles, rustle and swirl, chatter and bubble." In his autobiography, Adams draws parallels between Mole's response to the river, and his own, when taken to see a river for the first time as a small boy: 'The reaction of a simple creature - or a child - on first seeing a true river has already been unforgettably expressed by Kenneth Grahame... I certainly felt everything that the Mole felt and was carried away with delight as I held my father's hand across the plank bridge.' Adams compared himself to Grahame in an interview, when considering the relative lack of success of his subsequent works: "I'm not the only man who has - I wouldn't say suffered - Kenneth Grahame wrote plenty of other things but they're under the shadow of The Wind in the Willows" (The Telegraph, 8th November 2014).

Estimate £1000-1500

A. A. Milne. A complete set of first editions of the Winnie-the-Pooh Stories, 1st editions, Methuen, 1924-28, all original cloth gilt, 8vo

One of the authors strongly present in the formative years of Richard Adams was A.A. Milne: "This was the heyday of A.A. Milne - 1924 to 1928. Everyone read 'When We Were Very Young' and Pooh: everyone quoted them. Everyone knew that Christopher Robin went down with Alice, and that he said his prayers." Although Adams thought that the stories were somewhat trivial he felt they were "redeemed by the marvellous characters... 'Pooh' will survive on the marvellous characters all right, no danger."

Estimate £1000-1500

Rudyard Kipling. The Jungle Book, 1st edition, Macmillian, 1894 & The Second Jungle Book, 1st edition, Macmillan, 1895, original gilt decorated blue cloth, in bright condition, 8vo.

Estimate £500-800

W.S. Gilbert. The Bab Ballads, Macmillan, 1932, contemporary scarlet crushed morocco by Riviere & Son, each with an illustration from the book onlaid in coloured leathers, 8vo, contained in a red cloth slipcase. A fine onlaid binding by Riviere in exceptionally good condition.

Estimate £400-600

Charles Kingsley. The Water-Babies, 1st edition, Macmillan, 1863, 20th century green crushed morocco by Bayntun (Riviere), small 4to

Estimate £300-500

For further information please contact Paul Rasti or Susanna Winters

paul@dominicwinter.co.uk or susanna@dominicwinter.co.uk


Children's & Illustrated Books

Modern Literature & First Editions

The David Lansley Collection of Lewis Carroll

The George Fleming Collection of Victorian Greetings Cards

A selection of lots being sold 

15 December 2017

George Orwell. Down and Out in Paris and London, 1st edition, Gollancz, 1933, 8vo. 

Extremely rare in the dust jacket. George Orwell's first book and one of only 1500 copies printed. 

 Estimate £7000-10000

Charles Lutwidge Dodgson 'Lewis Carroll', (1832-1898).

A caged canary singing to the young Lilian Morgan, painted by her mother Alice Havers (1850-1890), circa 1885, pen and pencil and watercolour on wove paper, signed with artist's monogram lower right, 25 x 14 cm (10 x 5.5 ins), framed and glazed.

It has been established that this watercolour hung on the walls of Lewis Carroll's rooms at Christ Church College, Oxford. Dodgson first met the artist Alice Mary Havers (Mrs Frederick Morgan) on 30 December 1885 and 'found her pleasant'. Shortly thereafter he helped arrange for the publication of 'Bumble-Bee Bogo's Budget' with illustrations by Havers. Dodgson clearly liked her work and owned the original artwork for this book, as well as a set of proofs of drawings and several of her illustrated volumes.

From the Lewis Carroll Collection of David Lansley

Estimate £1,500-2,000

For further information please contact Paul Rasti or Susanna Winters

paul@dominicwinter.co.uk or susanna@dominicwinter.co.uk

01285 860006